Pupil Premium Report 2021 to 2024

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement for William Farr Church of England Comprehensive School
2021/22-2023/24

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

Note: The Pupil Premium Plan for 2019-2022 and this plan overlap as schools are required to report on Pupil Premium using this template (from December 2021).

School overview

Detail

Data

School name

William Farr C of E Comprehensive School

Number of pupils in school

1443

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

10.6%

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2021/22

to 2023/2024

Date this statement was published

December 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

October 2022

Statement authorised by

Jonathan Knowler, Headteacher

Pupil premium lead

Jane Grant, Assistant Headteacher

Governor / Trustee lead

Dawn Cooper

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£198,935

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£20,617

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£10,000

+ £22,882 School-Led Tutoring

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£252,434

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

William Farr (C of E) Comprehensive School’s vision is to provide all members of the school community with the opportunities to engage with ‘life in all its fullness’ (John 10:10) through the highest quality of education, encouragement and endeavour. We are committed to striving for excellence and ensuring that all students are known, valued and can achieve.

Our intention is that all students, irrespective of their background or the challenges they face, ‘engage with ‘life in all its fullness’, make good progress, achieve high attainment across the curriculum and move onto the next phase of education or training in line with students’ high aspirations.

Our philosophy of ‘a rising tide lifts all ships’ coupled with high expectations for every student underpin the strategy. Through high quality teaching, a nurturing care and guidance system and a personalised approach to meet students’ individual needs as required, children will thrive, succeed and fulfil their potential, both academically and socially.

We engage in a range of strategies. We provide a broad and balanced curriculum which makes an exceptional contribution to students’ outcomes so that children are engaged and achieve well. Key interventions and approaches are adopted on a whole school level and are not restricted to students eligible for the Pupil Premium. All staff take responsibility for disadvantaged students’ outcomes and raise expectations of what they can achieve. We understand that Pupil Premium is a universal term and there are groups of students who fall under Pupil Premium with different needs. We are clear that for Previously Looked after Children, Looked after Children and for Service students, the funding is not designed to support economic disadvantage and, like the main Pupil Premium (Free school Meals), is not designed to be a personal budget for an individual child and is to be used to support wider school initiatives. Students eligible for Pupil Premium benefit from this approach.

We have made use of a range of research, such as the Education Endowment Foundation and The Sutton Trust together with our knowledge of internal student information. The 3-tiered model is applied – teaching strategies, targeted academic support and wider strategies.

External references

DfE’s catch-up premium guidance; EEF COVID-19 support guide for schools; EEF Teaching and Learning Toolkit; EEF Promising Projects; EEF Improving Literacy in Secondary Schools Guidance report; The EEF Guide to the Pupil Premium.


Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number

Detail of challenge

1

Our assessments and observations suggest that where Literacy skills are not secure, and in particular, writing skills, meaning is impeded. In addition, students’ presentational skills have been highlighted as an issue following the pandemic. We know that students who are encouraged to take pride in their work will also take more care in their writing and are therefore more accurate in their communication.

2

Our assessments and observations show that students’ vocabulary could be more ambitious. This links to developing students’ cultural capital through a strong reading culture in the school.

3

Our assessments, observations and discussions with students and families suggest that the education and welllbeing of many of our disadvantaged students have been impacted by partial school closures to a greater extent than for other students. This is especially true for doubly disadvantaged students, ie, FSM + SEND. These findings are backed up by several national studies. This has resulted in some students falling further behind age -related expectations, especially in Maths and English.

4

Our observations and discussions with students and families reveal a significant degree of anxiety around sitting examinations. We will need to prepare students effectively by provided supported experiential opportunities.

5

Through students and family engagement, we have identified social and emotional issues for students such as anxiety and low self-esteem. These challenges particularly affect disadvantaged students, including their attainment and ambitions for their future. Bespoke support together with instilling a renewed sense of belonging to the wider school community will be important.

6

Our attendance data in the academic year 2020/2021 shows that attendance for disadvantaged students is 94% whilst attendance for non-disadvantaged students is 96%. We know that 94% is the equivalent of 11 school days missed in an academic year and the impact this has on continuity of learning.


Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

+ Progress 8

Attainment 8

% Grade 5+ in English and Maths

2023/24 outcomes demonstrate that disadvantaged students achieve at least as well as non-disadvantaged students

Improved attendance for disadvantaged students

To be in line with non-disadvantaged students

Improved writing and presentation skills among disadvantaged students in KS3

Recognised by teachers through engagement in lessons and through the Quality Assurance process, in particular, book scrutiny

To achieve and sustain improved wellbeing for all students, including those who are disadvantaged

Sustained high levels of wellbeing demonstrated by qualitative data from student voice, student and parent surveys and teacher observations


Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £125,000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Embed quality pedagogy to improve students’ Literacy Skills

‘By attending to the literary demands of their subjects, teachers increase their pupils’ chances of success in their subjects…Literacy is key to academic success across the curriculum as well as a crucial life skill for success in learners’ future endeavours. Young people who leave school without good literacy skills are held back at every stage of life.’

EEF Improving Literacy in Secondary Schools Guidance report

1, 2

Consistent approach to embedding literacy across the curriculum

1, 2

Further develop a reading culture, including the use of the Library

2

Low stakes testing and low threat knowledge checks across the curriculum to improve knowledge of gaps and celebrate success

Pupil assessment and feedback – ‘subject-specific assessments might be used to identify particular areas where pupils have forgotten or misunderstood key concepts’ (p4)

‘Effective intervention follows assessment, which can be used to ensure that support is
well-targeted and to monitor pupil progress’ (p5)

EEF COVID-19 Support Guide for Schools

Internal Student Survey June ’21 showed students concerned about learning gaps

3

Additional Curriculum time in Year 7 Core subjects (6 hours per core subject) + 3 hours additional teaching in Maths in Year 8

Reducing class size – ‘Moderate impact for high cost, based on moderate evidence + 3-month impact’

EEF Teaching and Learning Toolkit

3

Pupil Premium SLT Lead

A requirement to have a lead on PP in school

All

To support with school’s recruitment ethos of appointing teachers who are subject specialists

High quality teaching is the key determiner for student success, therefore appointing specialist teachers remains a priority

3

Development of CPD Model – repurposed meeting time to prioritise sharing effective practice across the school

High quality discussions on successful pedagogy underpin high quality teaching

1, 2, 3

CPD – National College training on Literacy for staff

Supporting great teaching – ‘Great teaching is the most important lever schools have to improve outcomes for their pupils’ (p4)

EEF COVID-19 Support Guide for Schools

1, 2

Whole school Inset for staff on Literacy (Using Recovery Funding Premium)

1, 2

CPD – The Key

Increased knowledge and expertise regarding supporting disadvantaged students

All

SEND Provision Map

Underpins support for doubly disadvantaged students

3

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £85,000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

English and Maths Intervention Coordinators

Evidence from Education Endowment Foundation – Teaching and Learning Toolkit: -

Individualised instruction = + 4 Months One-to-one tuition = +5 months Metacognition & self-regulation = +7 Months

Small group tuition = +4 Months

3

English 1-1 Tutoring (School led tutoring)

Evidence from Education Endowment Foundation – Teaching and Learning Toolkit: -

One-to-one tuition = +5 months

1, 2, 3

Strengthen Study Support programme with specialist provision

Teaching Assistant Interventions - ‘Moderate impact for very low cost based on moderate evidence +4 months’

EEF Teaching and Learning Toolkit

3

National Tutoring Programme – 3:1 x 15 Tutoring sessions in Maths and English Year 11 students, some of whom are PP students (Using Recovery Premium Funding)

Evidence from Education Endowment Foundation – Teaching and Learning Toolkit: -

Small group tuition = +4 Months

1, 2, 3

School Led Tutoring Programme – 3 ‘drop down’ days working with students in Maths and English, totally 15 hours (using Recovery Premium Funding)

Evidence from Education Endowment Foundation – Teaching and Learning Toolkit: -

Individualised instruction = + 4 Months

Metacognition & self-regulation = +7 Months

Small group tuition = +4 Months

1, 2, 3

Study Skills support for Year 12 and 13 – Elevate Education

Metacognition and self-regulation – ‘high impact for very low cost, based on extensive evidence’ + 7 months

3, 4

Study Skills support for Year 11 – Maximise (using Recovery Premium Funding)

3, 4

On-line SEND Assessment to identify students for ‘Freshstart’ – Phonics based intervention

Phonics – ‘Moderate impact for very low cost, based on extensive evidence + 1-month impact.’

EEF Teaching and Learning Toolkit

3

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £43,000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Embed and develop the targeted support and outreach work regarding attendance

Important for students’ wellbeing and academic progress to attend school

Legal requirement for students on roll to attend school

6

Embed and develop the targeted support and outreach work regarding careers and aspirations

Aspiration Intervention – research sites ‘very low or no impact (0 months) for moderate cost’, this is based on ‘limited evidence’. It is our view that, as part of a range of measures, this action can have a positive impact

5

Development of Student Hub to support vulnerable students

To meet the unique social and emotional challenges some students are facing

3, 4, 5, 6

Additional Student Wellbeing support (using Recovery Premium Funding)

To meet the unique social and emotional challenges some students are facing

4, 5, 6

Target setting process reviewed and changed to raise aspiration of student potential and progress

Aspiration Intervention – research sites ‘very low or no impact (0 months) for moderate cost’, this is based on ‘limited evidence’. It is our view that, as part of a range of measures, this action can have a positive impact

5

Uniform support for Years 7-11

Although research impact is ‘unclear’, we believe, from feedback received from students and families, that this support is important in terms of inclusion

5

Trips/visits support for Years 7-12

Evidence from Education Endowment Foundation - The Guide to Pupil Premium: A tiered approach To Spending

5

Stationery packs for Years 7-10

We believe this support is important in adequately equipping students for their learning

3

Music Lessons and instrument hire available for Years 7-9

Arts Participation – ‘Moderate impact for very low cost based on moderate evidence +3 months’

EEF Teaching and Learning Toolkit

5

Breakfast for students in receipt of FSM

We believe this support is important in adequately equipping students for their learning

All

Total budgeted cost: £253,000

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

Desired outcome

Impact

Ensure pupils are prepared for potential school/bubble closures as a result of Covid-19.

· Pupils were able to access online learning and were able to continue to make progress

· Children who did not engage as well with remote learning were contacted regularly and other solutions offered including attending school

· Positive feedback on ‘breakout’ rooms online to offer further support

· Laptops issued to students – students able to access online lessons and resources

· Most PP pupils attended and engaged well with remote learning

For PP+SEND students

· Phonics based programme, Literacy support and Study Support continued online during school closure

· Teaching Assistant support through ‘breakout’ rooms in small groups

Following school closures, support students with reintegration back into school.

· Maths and English Intervention programme for students with gaps in learning

· Enhanced support from EWO

· Use of Lincolnshire EBSA (Emotionally based school avoidance) Pathway to support students

Develop Quality First Teaching

· Modifications made to individual subjects

· Departments identified and focused on essential knowledge for success

· Changes to the sequencing of topics as some topics were more difficult to deliver remotely

· Revisiting, overlearning and embedding key concepts

· More opportunities introduced to assess where students are at in their progress (low stakes testing)

Develop school approach to the NTP in line with conditions of grant

· Research completed

· Planned programme and tuition partner selected for 2021-22

NOTE: Due to COVID-19, performance measures have not been published for 2020 to 2021, and 2020 to 2021 results will not be used to hold schools to account.

Disadvantaged pupil performance overview

Progress 8

0.28

Ebacc entry

3.8%

Attainment 8

45.97

Percentage of Grade 5+ in English and Maths

38.5%

Externally provided programmes

Programme (Academic year 2021/22)

Provider

National Tutoring Programme 3:1 Tutoring (Maths and English)

Pet-Xi

Whole class teaching – School Led Tutoring (Maths and English)

Pet-Xi

Study Skills Programme – Y11

Maximise

Study Skills Programme – Y12/13

Elevate Education

Motivational Speaker – Y12/13

Unstoppable Teen

Service pupil premium funding (optional)

Measure

Details

How did you spend your service pupil premium allocation last academic year?

Funding contributes to core subject support and is deployed in a targeted way as necessary.

What was the impact of that spending on service pupil premium eligible pupils?

In English, outcomes were higher for Service students than non-Service students.

VLE

The school's Virtual Learning Enviroment

Log in

School Brochure

Find out more about William Farr School

View

My Child At School

Our web-based system for accessing student details

Log in